<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On May 9, 2008, at 3:16 PM, Richard Laager wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; ">On Fri, 2008-05-09 at 01:25 +0200, Vivien Bernet-Rollande wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite">- secure memory handling<br></blockquote><br>This one is going to be tricky to handle properly. And frankly, I'm not<br>sure it's that big of a deal. I would focus on other goals first.</span></blockquote></div><br><div>When (if) you do get to that, you <i>might</i> find it helpful to look at Peter Hosey's AIWiredString he wrote for Adium, which produces a string object backed by wired memory that is never cached to disk.  It's in objective-c, but the backing is an array of C characters, so it might still be helpful.</div><div><br></div><div>-Evan</div></body></html>