<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Aug 9, 2008, at 7:52 PM, Mark Doliner wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; ">So the user's jid is "<a href="mailto:evan@adiumx.com">evan@adiumx.com</a>"?  Why would it matter what the<br>SRV record is for pidgin.im?  Couldn't you set the SRV record of<br>adiumx.com to point to xmpp.pidgin.im?</span></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This is not for the case in which pidgin.im manages all adiumx.com JIDs.  adiumx.com is still running its own XMPP server.  So setting adiumx.com's recor dto xmpp.pidgin.im would disable adium's server entirely.</div><div><br></div><div>The adiumx/pidgin domain names are just example; imagine that pidgin.im is a nonfederated server, which is not the realworld case.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; ">  Or set the connect server to<br>xmpp.pidgin.im?</span></blockquote><div><br></div><div>You could, and that would work.  However, that prevents the server from managing the connection destination, which is the entire problem SRV resolves.  pidgin.im's SRV record could be updated at a later time, or more usefully could be managed via a load balancer which distributes clients to</div><div>xmpp1.pidgin.im</div><div>xmpp2.pidgin.im</div><div>or</div><div>xmpp3.pidgin.im</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; ">Doing an SRV record lookup on the connect server doesn't seem like a<br>good idea to me.  The connect server is kind of an ugly workaround for<br>people who don't have the ability to use SRV records for whatever<br>reason.  Doing an SRV lookup on that seems like it could cause<br>confusion.</span></blockquote></div><br><div>The SRV lookup, of course, automatically falls back on the specified server/port if it fails.  It seems to me that doing the lookup fixes edge cases (such as I've described) and will effectively continue the current behavior for most users (for whom the connect server is indeed used because SRV fails on the domain portion of the JID for whatever reason).</div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,</div><div>Evan</div></body></html>